Follow us on
  

Making a difference!

Menu

Charlie's Blog Spot

Supplemental College Essays Matter!

Monday, May 16, 2016

The question is usually some variation of “Why Do You Want to Attend Our University?” And the answer to this question plays a much larger role in college admissions than you might expect. Usually found in the section of the application called supplemental essays, this question is the first thing college admissions counselors read, after they have reviewed a student’s grades and standardized test scores.  

A panel of admissions officers, who spoke at the May, 2016 Independent Educational Consultants Association Conference, in Boston, Massachusetts, analyzed the relative importance of the different parts of the student application. They said particularly, however, that they especially looked forward to reading this essay, eager to see why the applicant wants to attend their college.

The panel of counselors said that they read this even before the personal student essay, or the high school counselor’s recommendation of the student, or the teachers’ recommendations.

This is very significant feedback for students who, as the summer approaches, will be starting their college applications for the 2016-17 admission’s season. Especially so, as high school students, who are often rushing to finish applications, do not pay enough attention to this essay, thinking it unimportant compared to their personal essays.

Here is more information about the supplemental essay that the counselors shared. They said that they looked, first, to see if the student had shared any insights or revealed any knowledge about himself. Did the student know what he was looking for in a learning environment? In a social environment? Did she know in what career direction she might be heading?  The first part of this essay, then, should show evidence of self- reflection and self- knowledge?

The second part of the “why us?” essay needs to show that the student knows about the college and its campus. Hopefully the student has been to an information session. And to the campus for a tour. Or taken the virtual tour. Has the student read any of the student blogs on the college website? Looked at postings on Instagram about the college? Studied the majors that are offered? Looked at related programs of study? Figured out whether the academic atmosphere on campus is collaborative or competitive? What role do sports play on campus? What role performing arts? What is the character of social gatherings? Is there community awareness?

Finally the student needs to talk about how she sees herself fitting in on campus. What activities and programs will the student participate in? Will he play intramural sports? Do research in the physics lab? Perform in a comedy group? Sing in a girl’s a cappella group? Paint himself blue for the big game? Where does the student see himself fitting in?

How will the student ultimately contribute to make a difference to life on this campus? And, above all, who does the student hope to become during the time on campus?


 

10 Things to Know about Your College Essay

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

It is almost time to start working on your college essay, if you are a rising senior. Probably sometime after junior finals you will sit down to write. Here are a few things to know.

1. Admissions readers typically read about 30 files a day between January 1 and March 1, and sometimes during the “early admissions” reading period.

2. The purpose of the essay is to share with the college what else you, the applicant, will bring to campus. Colleges already have your grades, your scores, your recommendations, and your activities. So you need to show them something new. Would you, for example, be a caring, supportive friend in the dorm? A planner of major social events? An aesthetic sole who will appreciate art exhibits, concerts, and plays produced on campus? A person who would actively respond to an emergency? A survivor who knows how to persevere when things get tough?

3. An effective approach in writing the essay is to find a story about you to share. Maybe tell a story that shares an approach to life. Or a story about a particular moment of clarity. Or a story of how you became the you that you are. Or a story about overcoming setbacks. The story and the details, as well as the words you employ reveal who you are.

4. What kind of stories can capture the attention of an admission’s reader who is reading his or her 23rd file of the day? I have probably read more than 5000 admissions essays, which is not many in the scheme of things, but the ones that work for me are those with a genuine voice that let me see an awareness of life or offer an openness of self.
I remember one story called “Don’t get You Head Down” about a young woman who believed it was her mission in life to made sure others didn’t get discouraged. I remember a story called “Kankles” about an athlete who shot lacrosse goals and philosophized with his friends after practice, while they good-naturedly made fun of his short calves. I remember one story called “3000 Tries” by a future engineer who like Edison never gave up. Edison didn’t make 3000 mistakes when he invented the light bulb; he discovered 3000 materials that could not be used for a light bulb element. I remember another story called “Two Floating Sandwiches” about a young sailor who flipped her boat three times while attempting her first open-ocean race. If you can tell a good story, you will be remembered.

5. The obvious goal for your essay, given the statistics above, would be to strive to engage the reader in the story. To do this well, you should begin with a good “grabber,” continue with on-going tension, and finish with a final resolution.

6. & 7. Another goal for your essay is to talk in a conversational voice—not the voice you would use to speak to a teacher , but the almost informal voice you use when you are thinking out loud to a friend. A related goal is to imagine you are telling your story to a sympathetic listener who already knows and likes you. This audience could be an affectionate older brother, your savvy grandmother, your fairy-godmother. But I must be someone who already appreciates the real you and will value your story. This will make your story more authentic and real.

8. To brainstorm for the story you want to tell use a list of 60-80 adjectives and choose those that describe you. Then pick 4 or 5 that suit you the best. Tell a full story to yourself or others that illustrates why each specific adjective describes you. Then choose among you stories.

9. Your essay is only one part of the application. But sometimes it ties together other pieces into a better presentation. Other parts are: transcript, with school profile and level of academic challenge (1), standardized test scores (2), counselor and teacher and other recommendations (3), a list of your activities (4), and an interview report, if interviews are recommended or required (5).

10. How important is the essay? It has more weight at some schools than others. At the University of Michigan, I have heard, where GPA can be worth up to 80 out of 100 points, and SAT scores can be worth up to 12 out of 100 points, the essay is only worth up to 2 points. At some smaller schools, however, an apathetic essay can be the cause for denial even if grades and SAT scores are strong. I have also heard that in actuality in 3% of application outcomes, a student who would have been admitted otherwise is not admitted because of his essay. And in 2% of application outcomes, a student who would have been denied otherwise is admitted because of his essay.

Suffice it to say, the essay is important enough, or might be, that no one should write it the night before it is due. And also at some point it is the only thing left within a student’s control that can influence his or her admissions outcome.

Good Luck!
Jan Rooker #college #essay #teenadvice

3.   

 

6.   

To get into College, Be a Thermostat, not a Thermometer

Thursday, February 18, 2016

If you register the temperature and don’t try to do something about it when it is too hot or too cold, you are only a thermometer—you can record the situation but not change it. If you are a thermostat, on the other hand, you can call for heat or call for cool air when you sense that the temperature is not optimal. “I heard this admonition when I was growing up,” said a recent autobiographer talking about his childhood. Being a thermostat, his dad always taught, is the goal of life. It seems that Harvard University agrees with this criterion. See their recent discussion of what makes a good candidate (“Turning the Tide: Inspiring Concern for Others and the Common Good through College Admissions,” 1/20/16) .

Being a thermostat, not just a thermometer takes the kind of confidence that not many 16-year-olds have, however. For most of their lives they have been working hard to fit in, to first learn and then uphold standards—at school, in their families, on athletic teams and in their friend-groups. Asking a 16-year-old to look outside herself, identify an issue that needs fixing and become a change-agent is challenging.

But sometimes it happens. One of my student clients decided to help children who had to undergo chemotherapy. She saw, because of her hospital volunteering, that often these kids lost their hair and felt embarrassed. So she set to work collecting hats for the children. She asked sports teams like the Yankees and she asked celebrities to donate a hat. Then she asked everyone in her high school to donate one hat. Soon she was filling boxes and delivering them to local hospitals. And the National Cancer Society gave her an award.

A student, who lived in Massachusetts, spent time going to beaches on cold nights in October and November to search for sea turtles. Sea turtles on the East coast travel north for the summer to feed; then swimming south, many get stuck in Cape Cod Bay. Then the cold water causes their muscles to freeze. In the timeline of their species, the glacial creation of Cape Cod is recent. So, when their instincts tell them to swim north to feed, and then south for winter to reproduce, they get disoriented around the relatively new peninsula of Cape Cod. Working with the Massachusetts Audubon Society, and the Gulf of Maine Institute, this student with others made and launched wind-floats to help track the ocean currents in order to predict where the turtles would wash up on shore at night.

More recently a student worked on an issue about which she wanted to know more and about which she could see many students in her high school needed guidance—the issue of teens not getting enough sleep. This student began an independent study to learn as much as possible about deterrents--such as, coffee, TV and computer screens, late-night eating--that hinder healthy sleep. She also did a survey in her school to see how many of her peers, unaware of sleep deterrents, were using them and getting less than optimal sleep. Finally when she made her presentation of the findings from the survey and research, she invited not only the independent study committee, but the high school teachers who teach health courses and the vice-principal in charge of curriculum. In the end the health teachers agreed to include her findings in a unit the following year on how to get optimal sleep.

Each of these students was exceptional in his or her ability to see and affect issues outside his or her own circle of life. Each was successful in bettering the common good. However, each of them did these things because of a developed interest in an area. If you are looking to explore areas where you might become a change-agent, start with your natural interests and look for projects there, look outside your circle of life, but not too far.. Do something like my varsity baseball player who painted all of the little league dugouts in his town. And good luck!

To Get into College, Be a Thermostat, Not Just a Thermometer

Wednesday, February 17, 2016

If you register the temperature and don’t try to do something about it when it is too hot or too cold, you are only a thermometer—you can record the situation but not change it. If you are a thermostat, on the other hand, you can call for heat or call for cool air when you sense that the temperature is not optimal. “I heard this admonition when I was growing up,” said a recent autobiographer talking about his childhood. Being a thermostat, his dad always taught, is the goal of life. It seems that Harvard University agrees with this criterion. See their recent discussion of what makes a good candidate (“Turning the Tide: Inspiring Concern for Others and the Common Good through College Admissions,” 1/20/16) .


Being a thermostat, not just a thermometer takes the kind of confidence that not many 16-year-olds have, however. For most of their lives they have been working hard to fit in, to first learn and then uphold standards—at school, in their families, on athletic teams and in their friend-groups. Asking a 16-year-old to look outside herself, identify an issue that needs fixing and become a change-agent is challenging.

But sometimes it happens. One of my student clients decided to help children who had to undergo chemotherapy. She saw, because of her hospital volunteering, that often these kids lost their hair and felt embarrassed. So she set to work collecting hats for the children. She asked sports teams like the Yankees and she asked celebrities to donate a hat. Then she asked everyone in her high school to donate one hat. Soon she was filling boxes and delivering them to local hospitals. And the National Cancer Society gave her an award.

A student, who lived in Massachusetts, spent time going to beaches on cold nights in October and November to search for sea turtles. Sea turtles on the East coast travel north for the summer to feed; then swimming south, many get stuck in Cape Cod Bay. Then the cold water causes their muscles to freeze. In the timeline of their species, the glacial creation of Cape Cod is recent. So, when their instincts tell them to swim north to feed, and then south for winter to reproduce, they get disoriented around the relatively new peninsula of Cape Cod. Working with the Massachusetts Audubon Society, and the Gulf of Maine Institute, this student with others made and launched wind-floats to help track the ocean currents in order to predict where the turtles would wash up on shore at night.

More recently a student worked on an issue about which she wanted to know more and about which she could see many students in her high school needed guidance—the issue of teens not getting enough sleep. This student began an independent study to learn as much as possible about deterrents--such as, coffee, TV and computer screens, late-night eating--that hinder healthy sleep. She also did a survey in her school to see how many of her peers, unaware of sleep deterrents, were using them and getting less than optimal sleep. Finally when she made her presentation of the findings from the survey and research, she invited not only the independent study committee, but the high school teachers who teach health courses and the vice-principal in charge of curriculum. In the end the health teachers agreed to include her findings in a unit the following year on how to get optimal sleep.

Each of these students was exceptional in his or her ability to see and affect issues outside his or her own circle of life. Each was successful in bettering the common good. However, each of them did these things because of a developed interest in an area. If you are looking to explore areas where you might become a change-agent, start with your natural interests and look for projects there, look outside your circle of life, but not too far.. Do something like my varsity baseball player who painted all of the little league dugouts in his town. And good luck!

 

 


Read a sample chapter

Price: $14.95
(plus $5 S&H for paperback)

PDF DOWNLOAD
PAPERBACK